How to Write Historical Fiction Without Really Trying

Today I’m excited to have a guest post on Amie Winters’ blog, the author of Strange Luck and soon-to-be-published The Nightmare Birds (available for pre-order now!). Amie and I write very different books, but we have tons in common, from collecting fun socks to being writers from childhood. In fact, tomorrow is her monthly Throwback Thursday Writer event (#tbtwriter), so check back in with us both for this month’s fun (and usually funny) posts.

Before I wrote Anatomy of a Darkened Heart, I was sure I would never write historical fiction, even though I enjoyed reading it. In fact, I didn’t think it was possible for me to include that much research in a fiction book. So how does someone who is convinced they can’t write a genre end up with a debut novel, an upcoming fall publication, and a 10-year publishing plan that all revolve around that “impossible-to-write” genre? Find out in my guest post on Amie’s blog! Click here to read.

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Symbolism in the Victorian Era

I’m proud to say that this month, I’m officially sponsoring a fantastic website dedicated to the Victorian Era, and it’s appropriately called The Victorian Era! Geerte researches 19th century history and shares fascinating information, including little-known facts and details that are hard to find without doing in-depth research.

My blog post on The Victorian Era website is “Symbolism in the Victorian Era“, and it will give you a good idea of just how crucial symbolism and its interpretation was in the 1800s. From fans to flowers, parasols to jewelry and beyond, everything meant something.

Hope you enjoy the post and the rest of Geerte’s wonderful site!