Picture Tour through a Victorian Weekend Getaway House!

I promised in my Characters’ Psychologies video that I’d show you the Victorian house I’m staying in, so here are some great inspirational highlights from it. Hope they inspire you too!

Victorian house bedroom

Let’s start in the beautiful bedroom I’m sleeping in. Maroon walls, pink bed covers and pillows, and a chest with a story to tell. Ideal for me!

bedside lamp

The lamp at my bedside is perfect for reading. Each milk glass section lights individually and together to give you exactly the amount of light you want. The ambient lighting is also great for late-night writing in a notebook.

bedroom chest view

 

Damaged chest, perfect bed. Stories are in the making!

 

mirror and bureau

 

Little corner of cute.

 

glass doorknob

 

The beautiful glass doorknob and lock on my door.

 

hallway light

 

Let’s move out to the hallway. At night, this is the lamp that just barely lights the hallway.

 

blue flowers

 

My mom’s room is more of a beach theme (the place we’re staying is by the beach), so it’s a white and blue room. The owners of the house put these lovely blue and white flowers in her room as a finishing touch. I just think they’re so pretty!

 

blue room glass doorknob

 

Blue room glass doorknob. I love the contrast of colors.

 

child's view

 

A child’s view of the same doorknob. The slightly open door suggests a lot of possibilities to me. I also think the light blue on white seems very innocent.

 

damaged chest

 

Back to my room for a minute. I love this damaged chest so much!

 

lock

 

The paint is chipped away but the secrets remain intact.

 

darkened light

 

There is always light in the darkness.

 

self-portrait

 

Writer as photographer.

 

stairs

 

Let’s go downstairs.

 

mirror

 

Mirror mirror…
lion

 

This regal lion oversees the family room. He tops off a piece of furniture called a hall tree that acts as a chair, a mirror, and a coat hanger. It’s seriously unique.

 

carving detail

 

Beautiful carving details on the same piece of furniture as the lion.

 

lamp

 

The dining room is always dim, and at night this light casts an eerie glow over the wooden dining room table.

 

banister

 

Possibilities…

 

dramatic

And for the finale, something dramatic.

I hope you enjoyed this tour! This place keeps my motivation and productivity high. Do you have a place that does that same for you?

Cultural Writing: Why the Author Matters

I am a huge fan of writings from other cultures, whether written in English or translated into English from the original language. My favorite cultural literature is Asian; the cultural history is extraordinary and unique in every category (family, fashion, women’s rights, etc.), and the style of writing is very distinctive, even if translated into English. In fact, the writing style is so distinctive that I can always tell whether Asian literature is written by an Asian author or not. When someone from another culture writes an Asian novel, it’s easy to hear the lack of authenticity in the writing style even if the author has heavily studied Asian literature and culture.

A good example of this is Lisa See’s writings. Although See is Chinese-American, she is an American writer, and this can clearly be heard in books like Peony in Love and Snow Flower and the Secret Fan. While these books are enjoyable, they are not the same kind of enjoyable as true Asian literature. The style leans more towards American; historical references are peppered throughout on purpose even when they don’t fit to give the effect of an Asian writer (they end up sticking out too much); and descriptions are stiffly studded with references to Asian-specific things that don’t always fit or are over explained (peonies, the color red, good fortune, etc.).

All in all, writings from one culture’s perspective should be written by that culture in order for it to be authentic. While this seems redundant, it has yet to be accepted by those who still try to write in another culture’s voice. Here are some excellent examples of cultural writings which hit the mark:

– Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart
– Bette Bao Lord’s Spring Moon
– Pa Chin’s Family