I LEFT THE CORPORATE WORLD!

And no, I didn’t take another job! As of today, I’m officially running my editing business, Proof Positive, full time and dedicating more time to my writing. I never thought this day would come, but it finally has. Here’s a quick video talking about this difficult decision.

Thanks to everyone for supporting me along the way in my corporate, editing, and author journeys. I’m so grateful to my family, friends, colleagues, and fellow indie authors.

I have a number of announcements to make in the near future, updates about my publishing schedule, and changes across my social media—all things that were just waiting until I got the chance to live my dream 24/7. I can’t wait to share more news with you soon!

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International Women’s Day: 19th Century Feats and Real Rosie the Riveters

Happy International Women’s Day, everyone! Today is a day to celebrate the incredible feats of women and the fight our ancestors put up for our rights. The 19th century is rife with examples of women making huge strides that had ripple effects all the way through to this very day. Here are some wonderful things you may not have know about American 19th century women, plus some real pictures of Rosie the Riveters from World War II—these pictures are hard-hitting far beyond the famous poster we all know.

19th Century Women’s Rights Advancements You May Not Know

1824   The very first time in history that women workers went on strike was in Pawtucket, Rhode Island when the mill they worked for announced a 25% wage cut for them and a one-hour workday extension for everyone. Children and men also joined the strike, and in a little over a week the mill owners caved.

1825   The first women-only union was formed: The United Tailoresses of New York.

1845   After several strike attempts and unfortunate fails that cost them cut wages, women cotton mill workers formed the Female Labor Reform Association in Lowell, Massachusetts. They fought for better conditions in the mills, including safety and sanitation, and to reduce the work day from 12-13 hours a day to 10. They even opened more chapters of their group in other mill towns. You can read more about their hard fight here.

1869   The Daughters of St. Crispin was formed in Lynn, Massachusetts as the first national union of women workers.

1881   Nearly 3,000 African American women laundresses held one of the most extraordinary strikes ever in the south. Taking place in Atlanta, Georgia, these women gathered so much support that they could have shut the city down. What did they want? Respect in the post-Civil War south—and $1 per twelve pounds of wash. Learn more about this groundbreaking strike here.

1888   A law that requires women doctors for female patients in mental institutions was finally gained by suffragettes. There was quite a lot of physical abuse by male doctors of female patients in asylums throughout the 19th century, so this was a major win for women’s health.

1899   Florence Kelley becomes president of the newly formed National Consumers League with the goals of women consumers fighting for better working conditions and laws to protect women workers.

Real Rosie the Riveters

Two of the most famous Rosie images are the one on the left by J. Howard Miller in 1942 (hired by Westinghouse, the company both my grandparents worked for!) and the one on the right by Norman Rockwell for the cover of the Saturday Evening Post in 1943.

As powerful as these classic images are, they don’t come close to seeing real women working what were considered men’s jobs back in the day. Have a look at these inspiring images of real Rosies—welders, airplane repairwomen, arms workers, mechanics, engineers, and of course that’s just the start.

And who’s that in the reddish picture? Marilyn Monroe before she was a movie star! That’s right, Monroe worked at a Radioplane munitions factory when she was discovered!

I hope this gives you some facts and images you didn’t know and hadn’t seen before! Happy International Women’s Day!

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Announcement: I have a publicist!

I’m so excited to tell you I was just signed by a publicist, someone I have collaborated with for a while now: Creative Edge! Some of you may recognize this name – they have sponsored The Writer’s Edge and brought on phenomenal authors who I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing. Now I’m fortunate enough to be a part of the Creative Edge family! Having a publicist is an amazing next step in my writing career, and I’m very proud to be part of such a killer team. You’ll be seeing me in lots more places soon!

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Win Signed Dark Victoriana Collection Paperbacks!

Enter to win signed paperback copies of Anatomy of a Darkened Heart and Locke and Keye on Goodreads! One of each is available in their own giveaways below, and they both end January 24, 2018. Good luck!


Giveaway ends January 24, 2018.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

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Goodreads Book Giveaway

Giveaway ends January 24, 2018.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

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NaNoWriMo 2017 and Where to Find Me

Blank pages can be much scarier than deadly enemies.

 

If you didn’t know already, I’m doing NaNoWriMo this year – I wouldn’t miss it! If you want to hang out, support each other, or cry together, here’s where you can find me during November:

NaNoWriMo’s site. Add me as a writing buddy: https://nanowrimo.org/participants/christie-stratos

YouTube. This year on Twitter, NaNo vlogs won by popular vote, so I’m doing vlogs for the most part and livestreams here and there: http://youtube.com/christiestratos

Here’s my ever-growing 2017 NaNoWriMo video playlist.

GoIndieNow. In each episode of This Week in Indies I’ll be giving you NaNo advice: https://www.facebook.com/GoIndieNow/

Facebook. More fun memes to come, plus progress and info sharing: https://www.facebook.com/christiestratosauthor/

Of course you can check out my See What I’m Up To page for more ways to connect with me! 🙂 So far I’ve managed to write 4k+ words and not a single one was on the novella (GREED) I announced on NaNoWriMo’s site. ::sigh:: As long as writing is happening, I’m happy!

Christie Stratos – Locke and Keye Review

The Scary Reviews reviewed LOCKE AND KEYE today, and I couldn’t be more thrilled! What a wonderful and positive way to end the first day of NaNoWriMo. Thanks so much to The Scary Reviews!

The Scary Reviews

Review copy provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Locke and Keye is an attention-grabbing story from the beginning with the description of the lock and key shop and potential employee list. Mr. Locke, the owner, has a list of potential employees, each with odd comments and observations next to their names. He has carefully and purposely chosen which men to be his employees. I was intrigued to find out why and his reasons weren’t apparent until well into the book. Mr. Locke’s odd and strange mannerisms also caught my attention. The story is set in mid 1800’s and I thought it had a very authentic feel from the descriptions of clothing to the dialogue between characters.

As Locke and Keye’s story unfolds we see some familiar characters, the Whitestone’s, from the first book. Their role in Locke and Keye was well integrated into this new story. As for Mr. Locke he is an odd, mysterious and a frightening man. His actions towards his employees feels like he is grooming them for something sinister. Mr. Locke always seems to have an ulterior motive and loves to collect secrets and use them when the time is right. This is one of the many layers I loved about Mr. Locke and his character arc was really well planned out.

Psychological pain and games are a theme continues to run through Locke and Keye, as it did in the first book in the collection. Elizabeth isn’t…

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